Single stroke A stroke performs a single percussive note. There are four basic single strokes. double stroke A double stroke consists of two single strokes played by the same hand (either RRorLL). diddle A diddle is a double stroke played at the current prevailing speed of the piece. For example,


if a sixteenth-note passage is being played then any diddles in that passage would consist of sixteenth notes. paradiddle A paradiddle consists of two single strokes followed by a double stroke, i.e.,RLRRorLRLL.

When multiple paradiddles are played in succession, the first note always alternates between right and left. Paradiddles are often used to switch hands. Paradiddles are a quick succession of drumbeats slower than a roll.

  Drag

A drag is a double stroke played at twice the speed of their context in which they are placed. For example, if a sixteenth-note passage is being played then any drags in that passage would consist of thirty-second notes. Drags can also be played as grace notes. When played as grace notes on timpani, the drag becomes three single (alternating) strokes (rlRorlrL).

Flam

A flam consists of two single strokes played by alternating hands (RLorLR). The first stroke is a quieter grace note followed by a louder primary stroke on the opposite hand. The two notes are played almost simultaneously, and are intended to sound like a single, broader note.

The temporal distance between the grace note and the primary note can vary depending on the style and context of the piece being played. roll Drum rolls are various techniques employed to produce a sustained, continuous sound.

Roll rudiments

Single stroke rudiments The single-stroke roll consists of alternating sticking (i.e.,RLRL, etc.) of indeterminate speed and length. No.NameNotationExampleDescription 1.Single Stroke Roll Evenly-spaced notes played with alternating sticking. Though usually played fast, even half notes with alternating sticking would be considered a single stroke roll.

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